Season: 2021/22
 
Category: Splitboards
 
Manufacturer: Furberg Snowboards
 

The Freeride Split is designed to handle any type of snow and terrain you can find in the backcountry. The combination of high-speed stability, maneuverability and catch-free characteristics makes the Freeride Split one of the top splitboards currently on the market.

Furberg Freeride Split 21-22


Review 2021/22 

Board-Profile: Hybrid
Hybrid
Rider-Level:
AdvancedExpert

Length: 155cm  160cm  165cm  170cm  

Weight: 2.800g  2.950g  3.100g  3.250g  

Price (SRP) from: 849€
WP-Score:  
5.8

Included: Splitboard, Spark Clips, scarping tool for snow removal

Riding Style / Field of use


Riding wise, with this splitboard there is almost no difference from solidboards.
Freestyle, 70%
Allmountain, 80%
Powder, 80%
Speed, 80%

Test Results


Descent: The flex of the board is tuned a little softer, you feel very comfortable after the first turns and you stand confidently on the board. Even if things get a bit more rough, the Furberg always keeps you in full control. With the rockered nose you glide effortlessly through pow without having to shift your body weight too much backwards. The sintered base in combination with the stone grind glides super fast, which has a positive effect in longer flat sections. The grind with its many small grooves provides a little more speed in very wet snow and spring conditions.

Ascent: The skis float up well in powder, in difficult traverses or in steeper terrain, the edge holds perfectly. Due to its good balance point the nose comes up nicely and the kickturns go with ease.

Floorboard Technology

The tongue and groove system holds the board halves together without any play, ergo it rides like a solid. In hard snow conditions and especially on jumps and drops, the extra torsional stiffness proves to be an additional strength. A comparison video can be found further down in the text. In the ascent, we did not notice any disadvantages due to the additional metal edge, i.e. the spring. The tongue & groove system makes the board a few grams heavier and you also need two minutes more time for the conversion. But thanks to the included scraping tool, the extra effort is kept within limits and so far we had no major problems during the conversion. Sometimes a small screwdriver helps in the binding area, if you can not get into this area with the tool due to the binding plates. In many snow and weather conditions, however, freeing from ice and snow is not necessary at all.

 

Long-term Test

After two seasons, 30,000 vertical meters, 60 days of touring & resort riding with little hikes we arrive at the following picture. Topsheet chips a bit away around the tip and tail clips and needs to get reglued. The poplar core lost a bit of its camber profile, to be more precise, the low-camber profile decreased from 2 mm to 1 mm. It also lost a bit of its initial pop, but not dramatically.

Riding, 85%
Agility, %80
Edgegrip, %90
Uphill, 70%
Traversing, %70
Weight, %70
Features, 85%
Finishing, %90
Sustainability, %80

Description


The Freeride Split is designed to handle any type of snow and terrain you can find in the backcountry. The combination of high-speed stability, maneuverability and catch-free characteristics makes the Freeride Split one of the top splitboards currently on the market. This has also been impressively proven by Manuela Mandl with her victory in the 2018 World Tour. Its long sidecut radius makes the splitboard smooth and forgiving, while the rocker and reverse sidecut in nose and tail make it float remarkably well in powder and prevent it from cutting in.

New this season are clips from Spark and a revised wood core. Instead of pure poplar, a mixture of Paulownie and poplar is now used, the whole thing is additionally reinforced with ash stringers. This keeps the board alive over a longer period of time and does not lose pop and preload as quickly as with pure poplar wood cores. The flex has not changed, however.

Camber Profile

Flex Test

Tongue & Groove / Floorboard Tech